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2010-04-30

Increased liberty is a 'result' of increased security. If your liberty isn't increasing when a new security policy is implemented, then it isn't YOUR security that's being increased ...
Gotta love it ...

Thai watch

Also ...
Cool pic of Saturn ...

Naxal watch

The fight is over land, much of it in the interior, that has rich deposits of coal and bauxite. On one side of the struggle are the rebels--perhaps 10,000 of them armed and out in the field every day, and a militia of 100,000 who can be called up on short notice. Driven by a violent ideology, the Naxalites claim to be fighting for the land rights of the poor, especially farmers and small indigenous tribes who know only an agrarian way of life. On the other side are the wealthy families behind Tata Steel, Jindal Steel & Power and Vedanta Resources (run by mining mogul Anil Agarwal), who want to develop the untapped resources. (The three companies rank 345, 1,131 and 923 on the Global 2000 list.) Caught in the middle of the conflict between Maoists and billionaires are thousands of villagers.
Hmmm ... the same as it ever was ...

(via Reason)
I bet they are ...
Sometimes, stuff that seems like a really good idea at the time turns out not to be ... and at times like that it's cheaper to be invisible than it is to be invincible ...

2010-04-28

Interesting ...

Naxal watch

Sounds like the judge recognized that he didn't really have a lot of choice ...
Not even James Bond would scoff at the beautiful Hyper-Sub. After all, how could he not want to step foot onto a $3.5 million submersible powerboat?
Christmas is right around the corner ...

2010-04-27

Sounds like propaganda ... the question is by whom and for what reason ...

Thai watch

2010-04-26

Anything but allow the citizens to exercise their right to bear arms ... you all need to elect some less corrupt individuals if you ever want peace and security ...

Naxal watch

Also ...

2010-04-25

I gather that folks in NYNY are less afraid of their conscience than they are of calling 911 ...
Good thing there's a gun ban in place, there ...
Mexico seems to be coming apart at the seams ...
Probably should have been sorry beforehand ... more effective ...

Rio Grande watch

For many years, astronomers and engineers at various space agencies have been working towards achieving a very challenging goal – conducting a successful sample-return mission to a nearby asteroid. This June, the Japanese space agency JAXA could become the first to actually pull this off. Its battered Hayabusa space probe is currently on its way back after meeting up with the small, potato-shaped asteroid Itokawa, back in 2005. It is scheduled to drop a small canister containing the samples it collected from the surface of the space rock in the Australian outback, in only two months' time. Over the last five years, the small probe has suffered numerous glitches in various systems, which made its controllers almost call it quits on several occasions. However, the spacecraft proved to be more resilient than anyone thought, and engineers managed to patch things up from the ground sufficiently well to grant Hayabusa a fighting chance of reaching Earth. At this point, it is basically “limping” its way back home, but JAXA officials are convinced that it will eventually make it.
They will probably get over it ...

China watch

The Chinese modernisation plan of its Navy and building a sophisticated submarine fleet will curb the freedom of action of the US Navy in the Pacific Ocean. The Yalong Bay in the South of the Hainan boasts of an underground submarine base. The Chinese Navy is proud of it and looks upon its submarine fleet as the Defender of the Nation as well as the dissipater of the enemy fleet. It is understood that the Chinese Navy has 60 plus submarines poised to aim, shoot and kill a man of war of an enemy country. Generally speaking, the military strategists were of the opinion that China was 20 years behind America in armaments, guns, fighter jets and war ships. However, it is the considered opinion of the up-to-date strategists and planners that China is fast catching up. The warning bell has already rung and it is for the US Navy to take note of the growing prowess of the Chinese Navy.
You don't hear much about this here ...

2010-04-24

Sounds like a hard sell ...
In fact, recent polls indicate that not only will Mockus make it to a run-off, but he even has a decent chance of beating Santos. According to one survey, if the election were held today, Mockus would lose a second round by only about five percentage points. It is therefore not surprising that President Uribe, who until recently was quietly enjoying the final weeks of his incredibly popular two-term presidency, has re-entered the dirty world of Colombian politics to assail the Green Party candidate. His strategy of attack was equally unsurprising. Uribe’s hard-line security policies were a major reason for his immense popularity and he frequently denounces his opponents for their supposed weakness on security issues. Mockus’ academic background, nerdy demeanor and sunflower attire make him an easy target for such criticism.

Rio Grande watch

Thai roundup

Thai emergency services and the health ministry said Friday that one person was killed in grenade blasts that hit Bangkok’s business district. A Thai deputy prime minister put the death toll at three shortly after the five explosions which hit late Thursday, tearing through a pro-government crowd facing off against “Red Shirts” anti-government campaigners. The Bangkok Emergency Medical Service said however that a 26-year-old Thai woman was the only confirmed fatality, and that 85 were injured included three foreigners from Australia, Indonesia and the United States. “As of now we can confirm that one person is dead. We cannot find the other two people reported dead, after checking with hospitals,” an official at the centre told AFP. The public health ministry also said that one person was killed but put the number of injured at 78. It said that four foreigners were among those hurt, including one Japanese.
And ...
Also ...
A rocket carrying the X-37B Orbital Test Vehicle, commonly referred to as the "space plane," took off from Cape Canaveral in Florida. The space craft will significantly increase US fighting power and shows that the country has ambitions to "reach space and threaten us," Kornukov argued. "The US has completely spit on calls from Russia and the world to abandon plans for the deployment of weapons in space," he said.
Also ...
"As a superpower, the US has been calling for nuclear disarmament all these years and urged other countries to be more responsible for world peace and safety," Zhao said. "But in the meantime, its development of the space plane may lead to an arms race in space." Zhai Dequan, deputy secretary-general of the China Arms Control and Disarmament Association, said the impact of the space plane "may not be serious enough to trigger an arms race in space", but it has demonstrated US resolve to take a leading position in it.
Cool pics ...

Naxal watch

Good thing the Brit gubmint had the foresight to disarm the subjects before pulling this crap ... even so, I bet there  will be running battles in the streets before the next winter ...
It seems that we can't wait to change things around to prevent the tangos from winning ... too bad that changing things around IS them winning ...

2010-04-22

Hmmm ... she must be tired of being a public servant ...
A bunch of pics that make me doubtful about what's going on there ...

Naxal watch

2010-04-21

2010-04-20

It's probably a good idea not to advertise the location of you pirate radio broadcast tower ...
Sounds awfully ... uhh ... sane!
More recent desktop computers are powerful enough to drive, and in some cases enhance harder-to-crack encryption algorithms such as AES, enabling the option of running encrypted devices as standard. This takes away the need to worry about whether or not a certain piece of data should be encrypted, and indeed it removes the risk of forgetting. But full-disk encryption brings with it another challenge, that of key management. For an individual user installing their own software it’s not such an issue – you set up your own password and keep tabs on it in the normal way (hopefully not by writing it on a post-it and sticking it on the wall). Meanwhile, for a company, keys need to be managed at a central point. While tools exist for this, someone needs to maintain them and respond to user requests when keys are forgotten.
A veteran FBI official drew on 30 years of experience with the bureau to talk to local police about managing an "unstructured" crisis — one like the 2008 attacks in Mumbai, India, where coordinated shooting and bombing incidents took place across the city formely known as Bombay. While a similar incident has not taken place in the United States, the speaker, Danny Coulson, a retired deputy assistant director for the FBI, spoke at the annual Mid-Hudson Association Chiefs of Police Command Development Training Seminar last week about preparing patrol-level officers to handle such an attack. Coulson emphasized the importance of patrol and school resource officers because they are usually the first law enforcement officials to respond to a crisis. SWAT teams often don't get there until a while later, when it could be too late, he said."The SWAT is not the answer, it's an answer," he said.

2010-04-19

Hmmm ... never seems to be any data on what statistical effect its had on election violence ...
As is so often the case, it depends on what their aims are ...
Sounds like fun ...

2010-04-18

... or from favoring a wannabe despot like you ...

Thai watch

Naxal watch

Just what the baddies need ... a Gandhi all up in their grill ...

Also ...
 Furthermore ...
If you hold personal information on a Massachusetts resident, you were on the hook as of March 1. The question for security groups is, How do we comply with the myriad state-mandated data security laws without putting an undue burden on the business? And comply you must, because CMR 17.00 raises the stakes in terms of potential penalties. The law will be enforced, quite literally, in the breach, and companies can potentially be fined $5,000 per violation and per record lost. One stolen laptop loaded with a database containing the names and Social Security numbers of 200 Massachusetts residents puts you in the hole for a cool million. The Massachusetts law isn't remarkable in its overall requirements, but it is special in two areas. First, it requires businesses to attest that they have a working data security program in place to protect any personally identifiable information (PII) they've collected from state residents. Companies must maintain a comprehensive written information security program (WISP) that includes "technical, administrative, and physical safeguards" to protect PII. Covered businesses range from neighborhood dry cleaners to Fortune 100 companies, but the law stipulates that the program be appropriate to the size and resources of the business.
With governor Jan Brewer’s signature on the new “Constitutional Carry” firearm law today, Arizona becomes a beacon state for the nation on the gun-rights issue. Arizonans, who have been free to carry firearms openly since statehood in 1912, will now be free to carry discreetly as well, without permits or red tape. Low-crime Vermont has had this freedom intact since Colonial days. The permit system remains in place but will no longer be required for discreet carry. Alaska enacted a Constitutional Carry law in 2003, and Texas passed a limited version for traveling in 2007. Montana has enjoyed this freedom since 1991 on 99.4% of its land (outside city limits). These states experienced no increase in crime or accidents from the expanded freedom to discreetly bear arms in public. However, numerous dire warnings of “blood in the streets” preceded those new laws, but proved false. A list of circulating myths about the law, also known as “Freedom To Carry,” appears at the end of this article.
It would be nice to have a little more detail on the solution ...

2010-04-16

Sounds like more fun than you can shake a stick at ...
Unfortunate ...
Let's hope so ...
It should go without saying that if the company can get access to the plain text of the e-mails stored on its servers then somebody else can as well. Needless to say even if an online service proclaims they securely store your data and it can not be accessed that is not usually true. The only secure option is to encrypt the data while it’s still on your machine and then send it out. For instance I backup much of my data to an online store service. Before the data leaves my system it’s put into a TrueCrypt partition. Only I have the key to decrypt the partition so even if a government entity forced my storage provider to hand over my data there is no way for that provider nor the government to decrypt it (obviously I mean before I die, they could brute force the key but it would take practically a century and I doubt I’ll still be alive when they find out my encrypted partition contained nothing important nor incriminating).

2010-04-15

Yeah, going after authors ought to improve security ...
" ... all space-faring nations ... " - What a cool ring that has to it!
E-mail encryption has been around almost as long as e-mail itself, but due to quirky installation and support requirements, the security technology hasn't been very popular with many enterprises. Fortunately, the current crop of e-mail encryption products and services includes options that are easy to deploy and use and that don't require a great deal of IT support to operate. One such easy-to-deploy option is Hushmail Business, an entirely hosted solution from longtime e-mail encryption player Hush Communications Canada. As a hosted service, the Hush offering carries no client-side installation requirements. However, the company does offer an Outlook plug-in that works with Exchange and automatically handles the authentication and exchange encryption keys—something that used to be a major support headache. On the server end, administrators need only configure a company e-mail domain with Hush to handle the encrypted e-mail traffic.
A single-user, free Hushmail account is a solution of beauty, too ... there is a link to the right ...
Interesting ...
The only way they will ever become history is if some other tech advance makes them impotent ...

2010-04-14

Hmmm ...
It's pretty hard to tell what's going on in the video ... they don't seem to be awfully worried about the authorities showing up ...
I'm surprised disguises don't get used more often. Makes it pretty hard to look for you once you've taken it off ...
Good thing Comelec has banned guns ...
At least it's easy to tell what team everyone's on ...

Also ...
Interesting ...
Also ...
Keep that in mind while you're deciding what to do with all that U235 you're 'fugeing. We're peace-loving right up until you piss us off ...

2010-04-12

It's got a cool name ...
There seems to be a lot of revolution afoot, these days, what with Kyrg, the Philippines (at least in my estimate) and Thailand all more or less in the process ...

Also ...
That took some stones ...
Some cool pics ...
This looks promising ... 3 down, 47 to go ...
Geez ... good to know the new regime is reasonable ...

2010-04-11

History in the making ... I wonder if 60 years from now there will be Roza t-shirts ... only time will tell ...
The IP address led police to the Weber County Library. Director Lynnda Wangsgard said police have asked to look at surveillance video from the library to try to track who may have sent the e-mail. Wangsgard said they have not denied footage to police, but they are waiting for a formal request to be filed to release any documents. She said this is because of government policy and because they are not sure what information police are looking for. "That IP address is not associated with a particular computer or building," she said. "In fact, a patron using Wi-Fi access in the parking lot could have generated that e-mail. So we're not sure which record, if any, we would have that would be relevant to the situation." Wangsgard said the library does have general surveillance video but does not monitor computers individually. "We don't spy on people using computers," she said. "We have general surveillance to protect against vandalism, but we may not have anything that is relevant to the situation. We won't know until we get the request."
Can't really picture it happening, but I guess we can wait and see ...

2010-04-09

Definitely sounds like some underestimating going on ...
I can't see the justification for having 'activated a national alert system for all planes in flight' ...

Also:
Let's hope so ...
Jealous, are we ...?

2010-04-08

It will be interesting to hear how this shakes out. We seem to be all about the over-reacting these days ...
Interesting ...
I wonder if these fines will be levied against Brit gubmint personnel when they have breeches or is it just for the peasants ...?
Cool pic, too ...